SHIN BUDDHIST SPIRITUALITY

REQUIREMENTS OF SHIN

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NEITHER MONK OR LAYPERSON
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TANNISHO COMMENTARIES
FAITH, JOY AND GRATITUDE
MAPPO: OUR DECADENT AGE
POISON OF OUR WISDOM
AMIDA IS MY LIFE
EXPERIENCING SHIN
NATURALNESS
OTHER POWER
AFTERLIFE
NIRVANA SUTRA
REQUIREMENTS OF SHIN
ATTAINMENT WITHOUT A GURU
NEMBUTSU
SHIN IN 25 WORDS
NUGGETS OF BUDDHIST WISDOM
SHIN SPIRITUALITY EN ESPAŅOL
BELIEFS, PRACTICES AND EXPERIENCES
READING ROOM
RETURN AND LINKS

What does Shin Buddhism ask of us?

 

 

It asks that we become authentically real humans; aware of our limitations and imperfections…Waste material (compost) becomes the soil. No need to change. Come as you are. The same is with the nembutsu. What it’s done for me is to begin to release compassion in me, to make me more aware of my imperfections, and to aid me in working towards alleviating them, through the Nembutsu.

 

--Jerry Sawyer

 

 

Shin asks us simple to deeply hear the primordial call of life known as Namu Amida Butsu....

 

                                                                        --G.R. Lewis

 

 

For me, in my life, it’s accepting myself as I am and allowing myself to be transformed by my willingness to let go of how I think things should be. I make up the prison in which I see myself. As long as I recognize this fact, I am free and I can see the world I look upon in another way, in the light of compassion which shines back at me. I am then able to begin to understand the goodness of all living things, including myself, and their oneness with me.

 

--Lorein Cipriano

 

 

Shin is considered the easy path because there are no (prescribed) precepts, meditative practices or doctrinal knowledge required, just deep hearing.

 

                                                                        -- Harry Simonsen

 

 

Although Shin doesn’t ask that we become “wise, better, or more perfect,” it asks us to accept reality as it is while recognizing our human limitations and imperfections. We must realize the boundless compassion within.

 

                                                                         -- Diane Lux

 

 

Shin asks us to become our authentic selves and face the unacceptable parts of ourselves we try to deny. This is possible because of the boundless compassion that we have to support us in doing so. As a therapist, I try to encourage patients to not worry about whether they are normal of not. Being normal is not the goal of therapy but understanding and accepting who you are.

 

                                                                         -- Margaret Petersson

 

 

Shin asks me to consider just being me and in so doing, to believe that who and what I am is not significant in and of itself, rather I am part of the whole and that I am is already capable of being more virtuous just by becoming more open and aware. Becoming more my mind –when this happens, my ability to hear what is going on within becomes enhanced and hearing what is going on without less acute and disturbing. A sense of abiding peace begins to settle into my bones, lifting me up.

 

--Robin Kilgour

Namu Amida Butsu!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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